| Agenda | Day 1 | Friday, March 16, 2018

8:30AM-9:00AM
Welcome Session

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9:00AM-9:30AM
PS01: PLENARY SESSION
Opening Keynote Address
The opening address by one of the world's great global health leaders will outline the growing problem of inequality between and within nations, and how we can collaborate to address these challenges. Disparities across the range of social determinants of health undermine development gains and are a threat to national and international stability. This exciting speech will lay the foundation for the next three days of the conference.

Speaker:
- Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General, WHO  (invited)

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9:30AM-10:45AM
PS02: PLENARY SESSION
Why Disparities Prevail and What We Can Do About Them
Disparities across a range of social determinants of health are on the rise between and within nearly every nation. The top 1% have seen an extraordinary rise in the amount of wealth they control compared to bottom 90%. This has profound implications to people's  health and the stability of nations. This panel will delve into the impact these disparities are having on people around the world and what can be done to address them. 

Moderator:
- Jimmy Volmink, Dean, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosh University, South Africa

Speakers:
- Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General, WHO (invited)
- Mary Bassett, Commissioner, New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, USA
- Stephen Lewis, Co-Director, AIDS-Free World, Canada

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10:45AM-11:15AM
Health Break, Exhibits, Network

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11:15AM-12:45PM

CS01: CONCURRENT SESSION
Strengthening Health Systems and Public Institutions for Humanitarian Crises: Health Workforce and Governance
Crises are unplanned, ubiquitous and unpredictable in duration. Some are insidious, yet precipitate complex public epidemics. The global community witnessed a litany of crises: communicable diseases, including the Ebola outbreak and Zika; conflicts; war, genocide; starvation; mass migration; natural disasters, and substance misuse/opioid epidemic, each inadequately staffed and lacked resources. Health workers, first to respond, last to depart, need to be sufficient in number, technically skilled, and protected. The Expert Group report to the Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth (HEEG) lists humanitarian crises among their ten recommendations (Horton, et al 2016), which serves as a governance framework. This arm-chair style session focuses on building the health workforce, improving global and local governance, strengthening health systems and public institutions and managing humanitarian crises.

Moderator:
- Marilyn A DeLuca,  Associate Professor, Rory Meyers College of Nursing; Assistant Professor,  School of Medicine New York University; Founder & Consultant, Global Health-Health Systems-Philanthropy, USA 

Speakers: 
- Lisa Meadowcroft, Executive Director, ALIMA, USA
- Nadia M Cobb, Associate Professor, Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Director, Office for Promotion of Global Healthcare Equity, University of Utah, USA
- Juan Carlos Negrette, Director, Global Health Program, University of Utah, USA
- Marilyn A DeLucaAssociate Professor, Roy Meyers College of Nurising; Assistant Professor, School of Medicine New York University; Founder & Consultant, Global Health-Health Systems-Philanthropy, USA

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​​CS02: CONCURRENT SESSION
Confronting Water-and Climate Change Related Health Disparities in the Caribbean
Water, a health-, economic-, transportation- and ecosystem resource profoundly impacts health. This panel focuses on the interconnectedness of water insecurity and health disparities in the Caribbean region. A joint assessment of regional priority environmental health threats facing 18 million, predominantly health disparate Caribbean racial and ethnic minorities are water contamination, air quality, climate change, and a lack of EOH policies. This panel will feature four presentations: 1) the severity, burden of disease, and impact on wellbeing of water insecurity; 2) Ecosystem damage by mercury (Hg), a signature neurotoxicant associated with goldmining and climate change; 3) the impact of Hg exposure through contaminate seafood on vulnerable subpopulations especially during pregnancy ad early neurodevelopment; and 4) the disproportionate consequences of climate change especially on vulnerable communities.

Moderator: 
- Maureen Lichtveld, Professor and Chair, Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, USA 

Speakers: 
- C. James Hospedales, Executive Director, Caribbean Public Health Agency, Trinidad & Tobago
Paul Ouboter, Adjunct Professor, Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, USA 
- Jeffrey K. Wickliffe, Associate Professor, Evironmental Health Sciences, Tulane University, USA 
-  Maureen Lichtveld, Professor and Chair, Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane University, USA

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CS03: CONCURRENT SESSION
It Takes a Village: Supporting the Spectrum of Female Leaders in Global Health
Women comprise the majority of the global health work force, yet hold approximately one-fourth of top global health leadership positions both in the US and worldwide. This panel discussion will address the importance of female leadership in global health, with a specific focus on the breadth of global health leadership roles that can be filled by women. This panel will include leaders in the fields of nursing, obstetrics and gynecology, surgery, and the NIH Fogarty International Center; and will discuss challenges specific to these fields both in the US and in international settings.

Moderator:  
- Jennifer Downs, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Microbiology & Immunology, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, USA 

Speakers: 
Rose Molina, Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Dimock Center and Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston, MA
-  Miriam Mutebi, Consultant Breast Surgical Oncologist and Lecturer, Aga Khan University, Nairobi, Kenya
Nancy Glass,  Professor and Associate Dean of Research, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, USA
Roger Glass, Director, Fogarty International Center; Associate Director, International Research, National Institutes of Health, USA  

  
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CS04: CONCURRENT SESSION
Road Traffic Accidents and Disabilities: A Neglected Global Health Crisis
There were 1.25 million road traffic deaths in 2013. It is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, particularly affecting low and middle income countries. This panel of experts will share innovative approaches from low-, middle- and high-income countries that can be scaled up to address this globla crisis.

Moderator:
TBA


Speakers:
- Samath Dharmaratne,
Professor, Department of Community Health, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
- Stephen Hargarten,
Director, Injury Research Center; Associate Dean, Global Helath, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA
- Cathy Silberman,
Executive Director, Association for Safe International Road Travel (ASIRT), USA
- Adnan A. Hyder,
Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA


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CS05: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Social Entrepreneurship for Health
Social entrepreneurship uses innovation, market orientation, and systems change to drive impact. Social entrepreneurship encompasses a range of tools that can be used to promote health and well-being. For example, the group Riders for Health manage transportation systems for the delivery of health care in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The program generates revenues that are re-invested to expand the model. This program has filled a key need in the health system and built capacity for health service delivery. The symposium will focus on implementing and evaluating social entrepreneurship projects for health. This symposium will introduce the concept of social entrepreneurship for health, explaining both the pitfalls and opportunities of this approach.    

Moderator:  
-Joseph D.  Tucker, Associate Professor of Medicine, Director of UNC Project-China and Chairman of SESH Global, University of North Carolina, USA 

Speakers: 
-Alice Zhang, Fourth year medical student, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA 
-Allison Mathews, Director of the 2BeatHIV Project, Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Social Medicine and the Institute for Global Health and Infectious Disease, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, USA 
-Pablo Illanes, Partner at McKinsey's NYC Office, USA 
-Sean Young, Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Executive Director of the University of California Institute for Prediction Technology (UCIPT), USA
     
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CS06: CONCURRENT SESSION
Pathology: The "Missing Link" in Global Health Care Delivery
Pathology remains the critical “missing link” in global health. Its pivotal role in health care delivery has been greatly under-appreciated, particularly in low resource settings in Africa. Coupled with under-resourced and poorly standardized laboratory testing, effective diagnosis of diseases is challenging and becomes severely compromised. This inevitably leads to physicians making presumptive diagnoses that are ineffective and ultimately wasteful of scarce health care resources. Accurate and timely diagnosis is essential for developing appropriate and cost-effective treatment regimens for both communicable and non-communicable diseases. This panel will include global health expert pathologists living and working in Africa to discuss the range of challenges facing pathologists and laboratory medicine specialists and technicians in delivering effective pathology diagnostic services on the African continent. 

Moderator: 
- Quentin Eichbaum, Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology , Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA

Speakers:
- Ephata Kaaya, Vice Chancellor, Muhimbili University, Tanzania
- Rudo Makunike-Mutasa, Professor and Head of Department of Pathology, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe
- Dan Milner, CMO, American Society for Clinical Pathology ASCP, USA
- Jeanette Guarner, Medical Director, Clinical Laboratory, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Atlanta, USA



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CS07: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Oral Abstract Presentations

Moderator: TBA

Presenters: TBA

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CS08: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Oral Abstract Presentations

Moderator: TBA

Presenters: TBA

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12:45PM-2:30PM
LUNCH BREAK | Exhibits, Network

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1:00PM-2:30PM
ePOSTER ABSTRACT PRESENTATIONS

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2:30PM-4:00PM
PS03: PLENARY SESSION 
Disparities in Aging: A Prescription for Action
In older age, the full consequences of health disparities and cumulative disadvantage emerges, in terms of decades earlier disease, multimorbidity, frailty, cognitive decline and disability. Evidence now indicates that prevention and health promotion at levels of communities as well as families and individuals‎ works at every age, and into the oldest ages. Geriatrically knowledgeable health systems minimize adverse consequences and maintain autonomy at lower cost. In combination, there are large opportunities for compressing morbidity into the latest stages of human life, with resolution of health disparities as the target issue. The consequence will be to build health across longer lives, and thus unlock the opportunities of longevity.
This session will discuss the nature of health disparities that emerge in older age globally, goals and opportunities for prevention and maintaining function, and the import of health aging populations.

Moderator:
- Linda Fried, Dean, Mailman School of Public Health and DeLamar, Columbia University, USA

Speakers: 
- Isabella Aboderin, Senior Research Scientist, African Population and Health Research Institute, Kenya
- Harvey Brenner, Professor, Health Behavior and Health Systems, University of North Texas Health Science Center, USA
- Luis Miguel Gutierrez, Founding Director, Instituto Nacional de Geriatria, Mexico

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4:00PM-4:30PM
COFFEE BREAK | EXHIBITS, NETWORK

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4:30PM-6:00PM
CS09: CONCURRENT SESSION
Implementation of Cervical Cancer Screening in Low Resource Settings
Early detection and treatment of cervical cancer is critical to address the unacceptably high morbidity and mortality in low and middle income countries. Self-testing for HPV is cost effective and feasible in many low resource areas that have low screening rates and subsequent high incidence of late-stage cervical cancer. This panel will discuss strategies for the implementation of cervical cancer self-screening in low resource settings as well as how to address barriers to screening in diverse populations. The panel speakers represent experience in screening implementation in diverse settings that require innovative screening approaches.

Moderator: 
Dr. Laura Rozek, Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, USA

Speakers:
- Mesrach Ayalew Kebede, Research Investigator and Lecturer, St. Paul's Hospital Millennial Medical College, Ethiopia
- Rafael Meza, Associate Professor, Epidemiology, Global Public Health Faculty Associate, University of Michigan School of Public Health, USA
- Gloria I. Sanchez, Associate Professor, University of Antioquia School of Medicine, Colombia 

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CS10: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Health and Armed Conflicts: Perspectives on a Global Challenge
The panel explores the global health challenges resulting from armed conflicts, focusing on MENA, and the importance of global south-based work. The first theme, building on research of The Lancet-AUB Commission on Syria, explores the implications of the Syria and new armed conflicts for global health. Panelists discuss how internationalized conflicts and their consequences challenge global health academia, policy and practice but also open new spaces for research, mobilization, accountability, and collaborations. The second theme builds on the work of the conflict medicine program at AUB GHI in responding to the changing ecologies of war and the interdisciplinary efforts of medical and social science research in shaping our understanding of a range of global health problems, including the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, cancer, and the therapeutic geographies of care across the region.  

Moderators: 
- Iman Nuwayhid,  Professor and Dean, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
- Shadi Saleh, Founding Director, Global Health Institute; Associate Vice President, Health Affairs, Professor of Health Systems and Financing, American University of Beirut, Lebanon

Speakers: 
Samer Jabbour, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
- Jennifer Leaning, Director, FXB Center for Health & Human Rights, Harvard University; FXB Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
- Ghassan Abu Sitta Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgury, Head of Division of Plastic  and Reconstructive Surgury, Co-Director of the Conflict Medicine Program, Global Health Insitute, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
- Omar Dewachi, Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Global Health; Co-Director, Conflict Medicine Program, Global Health Institute, American University of Beirut, Lebanon 

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CS11: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Translating Research into Action in a Challenged Region: Programs to Stem the Tide of HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) is the only region globally where both HIV incidence and mortality is rising. Multiple social and structural barriers to the implementation of HIV prevention and treatment have been identified, including suboptimally scaled opioid agonist therapies, inadequate harm reduction services, poor retention in care and limited treatment access for comorbidities. Thus, the epidemic is growing in the setting of multiple gaps of translation of evidence-based interventions into cost-effective programs. The NIH funded investigators in this symposium will highlight the unique aspects of the EECA HIV epidemic and the challenges to implementing evidence-based interventions in the region.

Moderator: 
-Jack A. DeHovitz, Distinguished Service Professor, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, USA

Speakers: 
-Nabila El-Bassel, Professor, Columbia University School of Social Work, USA
-Don C. Des Jarlais, Professor of Psychiatry and Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai; Guest Investigator, Rockefeller University, USA
-Frederick L. Altice, Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, USA
-Olga Morozova, PhD Candidate, Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, USA

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CS12: CONCURRENT SESSION 
NIH Fogarty International Center Pathways to Global Health Research Careers: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Since 2004, the Fogarty International Center, with partners at the National Institutes of Health, have supported global health research training for over 1,000 U.S. trainees. The current Global Health Fellows and Scholars Program supports six consortia of U.S. academic institutions to provide mentored research training opportunities at international partner institutions in developing countries with robust clinical research programs. Each consortium includes four U.S. academic institutions and their respective international partner institutions, and offers global health research training in communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases, maternal and child health and One Health. The program is open to U.S. and LMIC pre- and postdoctoral trainees from all health-related disciplines. Alumni of the three programs will discuss their research and training experiences, as well as their career paths.

Moderator: TBA

Speakers: TBA

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CS13: CONCURRENT SESSION
The Lancet Commission on Pollution & Health; Main Findings and Recommendations for the Future
This Plenary Session will present the main findings and recommendations of The Lancet Global Commission on Pollution & Health. Pollution is the largest environmental cause of disease and death in the world today. It is responsible for 9 million deaths each year - three times as many as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined - as well as for massive economic costs. Despite their great and growing magnitude, pollution and pollution-related disease can be prevented. Yet pollution and pollution-related disease are neglected in the global health and international development agendas and gravely underfunded. This report makes recommendations on how to: (1) end neglect of pollution; (2) focus the world’s attention on the silent threat of pollution-related disease; and (3) mobilize the resources, funding, and political that will needed to control pollution.

Moderator: 
- Philip J. Landrigan, Dean for Global Health, Arnhold Global Health Institute at Mount Sinai, USA

Speakers: 
Maureen Cropper, Distinguished University Professor of Economics, University of Maryland, USA
Maureen McTeer,  Adjunct Professor of Health Law, University of Ottawa, Canada 
Richard Fuller, President, Pure Earth, USA

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CS14: CONCURRENT SESSION
Disparities in Access to Education and Global Health Training and How to Overcome Them Among Minorities in the US
​Description TBA

Moderator: TBA

Speakers: 
- Jenny Samaan,
Senior Director, GHLO, Association of American Medical Colleges, USA
- David Himmelstein,  
Professor, City University of New York School of Public Health at Hunter College, USA
- Shannon Marquez,
Vice Provost and Clinical Professor, Drexel University, USA


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CS15: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Oral Abstract Presentations

Moderator: TBA
Presenters: TBA

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CS16: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Oral Abstract Presentation

Moderator: TBA
Presenters: TBA

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6:30PM-8:00PM
CUGH RECEPTION 
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